A Note From NYU Game Center Director Frank Lantz on the EVO Scholarship
"I remember the moment, 20 years ago, when something clicked in my head. I was watching two of my co-workers play Mortal Kombat, and it suddenly occurred to me that what was happening beneath the surface of the game was something quite a bit like Chess. Now on the face of it Mortal Kombat couldn’t look any less like Chess, it is a grisly, garish, cartoon of a game, it looks like something made, not just for children, but for children with very bad taste. But watching the game closely, and playing it myself, revealed something else. What looked like a flurry of actions was actually a flurry of *decisions*, choices and counter-choices, calculations and predictions, all happening so quickly that they were almost a blur, but still quite obviously intensely *cognitive* in nature, an experience about *thinking*.
That something that looked so dumb could give way, under the hood, to a kind of hyper-intelligence was a surprise and delight, especially to a fan of paradox and irony. I’ve never forgotten that moment, and that sense of delight continues to inform my love of all kinds of games…”
Read Frank’s full thoughts on the Game Center EVO Scholarship here.
And tune into the EVO stream this weekend, upgrade to premium, and help make someone’s dreams of being a game designer a reality!  High-res

A Note From NYU Game Center Director Frank Lantz on the EVO Scholarship

"I remember the moment, 20 years ago, when something clicked in my head. I was watching two of my co-workers play Mortal Kombat, and it suddenly occurred to me that what was happening beneath the surface of the game was something quite a bit like Chess. Now on the face of it Mortal Kombat couldn’t look any less like Chess, it is a grisly, garish, cartoon of a game, it looks like something made, not just for children, but for children with very bad taste. But watching the game closely, and playing it myself, revealed something else. What looked like a flurry of actions was actually a flurry of *decisions*, choices and counter-choices, calculations and predictions, all happening so quickly that they were almost a blur, but still quite obviously intensely *cognitive* in nature, an experience about *thinking*.

That something that looked so dumb could give way, under the hood, to a kind of hyper-intelligence was a surprise and delight, especially to a fan of paradox and irony. I’ve never forgotten that moment, and that sense of delight continues to inform my love of all kinds of games…”

Read Frank’s full thoughts on the Game Center EVO Scholarship here.

And tune into the EVO stream this weekend, upgrade to premium, and help make someone’s dreams of being a game designer a reality!